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Dwayne Wade Gets '2011 Fatherhood Award'

He didn’t win an NBA championship, but he’s definitely winning in his personal life.

Miami Heat player Dwayne Wade is the 2011 recipient for the “Fatherhood Award” from the National Fatherhood Initiative.  Wade recently won full custody of his two sons, Zaire and Zion.

The INFI’s president, Rolan C. Warren,  had the following to say about Dwayne:

“This Fatherhood Award™ reflects Dwyane’s commitment to being the kind of dad his sons need him to be. He gives dads everywhere a great example of what it means to be an involved, responsible, and committed father.”

Dwayne is also thrilled about this honor:

“I am so thrilled to be given this award, especially because it is in recognition of most important thing in my life, my kids. Nothing in the world compares to the happiness that they bring me each and every day.”

“I know that my biggest responsibility is to be there for them 100% and to demonstrate to other fathers that it is possible to be a strong male figure in your children’s lives regardless of what else is going on in your life.”

Now that’s a good look.

 


Dwayne Wade Gets ‘2011 Fatherhood Award’

He didn’t win an NBA championship, but he’s definitely winning in his personal life.

Miami Heat player Dwayne Wade is the 2011 recipient for the “Fatherhood Award” from the National Fatherhood Initiative.  Wade recently won full custody of his two sons, Zaire and Zion.

The INFI’s president, Rolan C. Warren,  had the following to say about Dwayne:

“This Fatherhood Award™ reflects Dwyane’s commitment to being the kind of dad his sons need him to be. He gives dads everywhere a great example of what it means to be an involved, responsible, and committed father.”

Dwayne is also thrilled about this honor:

“I am so thrilled to be given this award, especially because it is in recognition of most important thing in my life, my kids. Nothing in the world compares to the happiness that they bring me each and every day.”

“I know that my biggest responsibility is to be there for them 100% and to demonstrate to other fathers that it is possible to be a strong male figure in your children’s lives regardless of what else is going on in your life.”

Now that’s a good look.

 


divaFotos: Dallas Mavericks Celebrate Championship at LIV Nightclub

Dallas Mavericks whooped some Miami Heat ass last night…and it looks like they had a celebration after.  Dirk and the rest of the crew gathered at LIV Nightclub in Miami for drinks, dancing and the “pass the trophy” game.  How the hell did Lil Wayne get a hold of it?!  Other celebs on the scene were Trey Songz, Lil Twist and Mavs owner Mark Cuban.

Check ’em out:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dwayne Wade’s Open Letter on Fatherhood

Dwayne and the Miami Heat may have lost Game 4 of the NBA Finals last night, but it looks like he’s winning in his personal life.   Besides having the beautiful Gabrielle Union by his side, he also has full custody of his two sons, Zaire and Zion.  We all watched as he went through a pretty nasty public divorce with Siovaughn, his kids’ mother, that led to all kinds of hot messes.

In an open letter to Newsweek, Dwayne talks about how rewarding  being a father is (he also sent the super cute picture of him and his boys, taken by Bob Metelus).  It’s titled My Life as an NBA Superstar Dad:

There are a few words that come to mind when I think about the past couple years of my life: challenging, rewarding, transformative—they roll off the tip of my tongue in an instant. In the span of a year my two good friends LeBron James and Chris Bosh joined me on the Miami Heat, I struggled through a painful, public divorce, and I became the full-time parent to my two young sons, Zaire and Zion.

I’ve had some ups and downs lately, but the memories of the unpleasant times disappear quickly, in part because of moments like the one recently when I was able to surprise my younger son, Zion, at his school with cupcakes for his fourth birthday. It was the day after we’d won the Eastern Conference finals, but that victory couldn’t compare with the huge smile on Zion’s face at that moment. I will never forget it. Bad memories vanish each morning when I walk into both of my sons’ bedrooms to wake them up for school—their laughter gives me all I need to face whatever is happening in my life. Not too long ago, due to custody issues, I wasn’t allowed to see my sons for long periods of time, or was given the chance to see them for only a few hours with no idea of if or when I’d see them again. I can’t describe how trying those days were, fighting for full custody while also working as a professional basketball player nine months of the year. I just knew I wanted to be with my kids.

I was seriously motivated to be a full-time parent for my sons. My mother and father weren’t together when I was a kid growing up in Chicago, and early on my mother fell victim to drug abuse. At 9 years old, I moved in with my father because my mother could no longer care for me. Looking back, I now see so many similarities between my own childhood and that of my sons. My father stepped in when I needed him, and that gave me the chance for a better life. That’s what I’m doing for my boys now.

All children need their fathers, but boys especially need fathers to teach them how to be men. I remember wanting that so badly before I went to live with my dad. I wanted someone to teach me how to tie a tie and walk the walk, things only a man can teach a boy. Of course, back then, I never could have imagined being in the same situation someday with my own kids. My dad and I bumped heads a lot—we were so alike, both of us born competitors. My older son, Zaire, is exactly the same way. We’ll battle on the court when I’m 39 and he’s 19. He’s 9 now, and he’s grown up with basketball. Zion could take it or leave it, which is cool by me.

Today, I constantly tell my dad how much I appreciate what he did for me. I think you really have to become a parent to understand what you will endure to be there for your kids. I could say I was surprised at the criticism I received for traveling from Miami to Chicago so often during the regular season for my custody court cases, but nothing really surprises me anymore. I had a duty to fight to be with my kids, and I did it.

Thankfully, I’ve gotten a lot of support from my mother, sister, and others in taking care of my boys and making their new living arrangements a smooth and happy transition. Going forward, I want my sons to have a healthy relationship with their mother, and that’s something we’re working on. I hope to have a great relationship with her one day too, because I know how much it meant to me to see my parents get along as time went on.

I can’t say what we’ll do for Father’s Day, because since my sons came to live with me about two months ago, every day has been like Father’s Day. I just want people—men, and men of color in particular—to hear my story and know that their children need them and that it’s their responsibility to be there for them. We have to step up as men and do our part. There are no excuses.

Eloquent and straight to the point.  Love it!


Dwayne Wade's Open Letter on Fatherhood

Dwayne and the Miami Heat may have lost Game 4 of the NBA Finals last night, but it looks like he’s winning in his personal life.   Besides having the beautiful Gabrielle Union by his side, he also has full custody of his two sons, Zaire and Zion.  We all watched as he went through a pretty nasty public divorce with Siovaughn, his kids’ mother, that led to all kinds of hot messes.

In an open letter to Newsweek, Dwayne talks about how rewarding  being a father is (he also sent the super cute picture of him and his boys, taken by Bob Metelus).  It’s titled My Life as an NBA Superstar Dad:

There are a few words that come to mind when I think about the past couple years of my life: challenging, rewarding, transformative—they roll off the tip of my tongue in an instant. In the span of a year my two good friends LeBron James and Chris Bosh joined me on the Miami Heat, I struggled through a painful, public divorce, and I became the full-time parent to my two young sons, Zaire and Zion.

I’ve had some ups and downs lately, but the memories of the unpleasant times disappear quickly, in part because of moments like the one recently when I was able to surprise my younger son, Zion, at his school with cupcakes for his fourth birthday. It was the day after we’d won the Eastern Conference finals, but that victory couldn’t compare with the huge smile on Zion’s face at that moment. I will never forget it. Bad memories vanish each morning when I walk into both of my sons’ bedrooms to wake them up for school—their laughter gives me all I need to face whatever is happening in my life. Not too long ago, due to custody issues, I wasn’t allowed to see my sons for long periods of time, or was given the chance to see them for only a few hours with no idea of if or when I’d see them again. I can’t describe how trying those days were, fighting for full custody while also working as a professional basketball player nine months of the year. I just knew I wanted to be with my kids.

I was seriously motivated to be a full-time parent for my sons. My mother and father weren’t together when I was a kid growing up in Chicago, and early on my mother fell victim to drug abuse. At 9 years old, I moved in with my father because my mother could no longer care for me. Looking back, I now see so many similarities between my own childhood and that of my sons. My father stepped in when I needed him, and that gave me the chance for a better life. That’s what I’m doing for my boys now.

All children need their fathers, but boys especially need fathers to teach them how to be men. I remember wanting that so badly before I went to live with my dad. I wanted someone to teach me how to tie a tie and walk the walk, things only a man can teach a boy. Of course, back then, I never could have imagined being in the same situation someday with my own kids. My dad and I bumped heads a lot—we were so alike, both of us born competitors. My older son, Zaire, is exactly the same way. We’ll battle on the court when I’m 39 and he’s 19. He’s 9 now, and he’s grown up with basketball. Zion could take it or leave it, which is cool by me.

Today, I constantly tell my dad how much I appreciate what he did for me. I think you really have to become a parent to understand what you will endure to be there for your kids. I could say I was surprised at the criticism I received for traveling from Miami to Chicago so often during the regular season for my custody court cases, but nothing really surprises me anymore. I had a duty to fight to be with my kids, and I did it.

Thankfully, I’ve gotten a lot of support from my mother, sister, and others in taking care of my boys and making their new living arrangements a smooth and happy transition. Going forward, I want my sons to have a healthy relationship with their mother, and that’s something we’re working on. I hope to have a great relationship with her one day too, because I know how much it meant to me to see my parents get along as time went on.

I can’t say what we’ll do for Father’s Day, because since my sons came to live with me about two months ago, every day has been like Father’s Day. I just want people—men, and men of color in particular—to hear my story and know that their children need them and that it’s their responsibility to be there for them. We have to step up as men and do our part. There are no excuses.

Eloquent and straight to the point.  Love it!


Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Schools Scottie Pippen

NBA’s Scottie Pippen raised a lot of eyebrows when he compared Miami Heat’s Lebron James to Michael Jordan.  In an open letter to the Los Angeles Times, NBA great Kareem Abdul-Jabbar writes Scottie and corrects him on his assumptions.

It reads:

Dear Scottie,

I have nothing but respect for you my friend as an athlete and knowledgeable basketball mind. But you are way off in your assessment of who is the greatest player of all time and the greatest scorer of all time. Your comments are off because of your limited perspective. You obviously never saw Wilt Chamberlain play who undoubtedly was the greatest scorer this game has ever known. When did MJ ever average 50.4 points per game plus 25.7 rebounds? (Wilt in the 1962 season when blocked shot statistics were not kept). We will never accurately know how many shots Wilt blocked. Oh, by the way in 1967 and 68, Wilt was a league leader in assists. Did MJ ever score 100 points in a game? How many times did MJ score more than 60 points in a game? MJ led the league in scoring in consecutive seasons for 10 years but he did this in an NBA that eventually expanded into 30 teams vs. when Wilt played and there were only 8 teams….

In terms of winning, Michael excelled as both an emotional and scoring leader but Bill Russell’s Celtics won eight consecutive NBA Championships. Bill’s rebounding average per game is over 22.5 lifetime, MJs best rebounding years was eight per game (1989).… Bill played on a total of 11 championship teams and as you very well know, Scottie, the ring is the thing, and everything else is just statistics. So I would advise you to do a little homework before crowning Michael or LeBron with the title of best ever. As dominant as he is, LeBron has yet to win a championship. I must say that it looks like Miami has finally put the team together that will change that circumstance. Its my hope that today’s players get a better perspective on exactly what has been done in this league in the days of yore.

Affectionately,

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar,
NBA’s All-Time Leading Scorer

DAMN!  Sounds like Kareem knows what he’s talking about.  Do YOU agree.  Lebron seems to, because he responded with the following statement:

“Michael’s an unbelievable player.  I’ve got a long way—long way—to be mentioned as far as one of the all-time greats. Not even just Jordan. There’s a lot of great players who have played in this league. Larry Bird, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, all these guys who are floating around with multiple rings, Bill Russell, all these guys who have pioneered this game.

“I’m gracious. Humbled by Scottie’s comments, especially with him being a teammate of his and seeing Michael on a day-to-day basis. But as far as me, I’m not going to sit here and say I’m better than Jordan. I’m not better than Jordan.”

I’m more interested in what Lebron is hiding under that headband.  Who’s with me?!


Keyshia Cole and Boobie Gibson Married

Congrats are in order for West Coast R&B darling Keyshia Cole and her baller beau Daniel “Boobie” Gibson.  They were married in a private ceremony in Las Vegas over the weekend.  They originally planned for a tropical wedding in Bora Bora, but their schedules wouldn’t permit.  They became engaged in January 2010, about a year after they started dating.  They already have a son, 14-month old Daniel Jr.

Gibson tweeted:

“It’s OFFICIAL!!!!! #Done & #TrulyBlessed.. Mr. & Mrs. Gibson. We appreciate all the Well Wishes!!  One of the Best nights of our Lives.. #NoQuestion.”

Keyshia’s close friend Monica was the first to congratulate them on Twitter:

“Congratulations to @keyshiacole Wishing u guys a lifetime of happiness,” she wrote.

You gotta love LOVE.